Three’s Company


Threes CompanyWhat follows in this post is pure fantasy and speculation, directly out of my head. Or not.

Over the past few weeks I’ve been talking to vendors and some end user types about Information-Governance-as-a-Service (IGaaS). Forget for a moment that no one vendor does all aspects of IG, or that there’s not even a universally accepted definition of IG. Focus instead on the lighter touch that’s required today when so many enterprise tools are required to have a consumer experience about them. Also think about Content-as-a-Service (CaaS, defined here) and what that means for building the apps needed to work with, manage, and govern content.

To save time, let’s get the fawning out of the way:

  • Box – I am unashamedly and unabashedly a fan;
  • Egnyte – see Box. I’m not getting into what Egnyte announced in this blog as there are plenty of great summaries around the web, including Egnyte’s site;
  • GlassIG – more quietly, but see Egnyte.

Pay attention to all three of those companies if you are remotely interested in Information Governance and/or Management. There are other companies that I think are pretty damn good, but when it comes to managing and governing content in cloud or hybrid environments, these are my three. Oracle Web Center Content would be my go to for on-premises ECM (w/some nascent cloud capabilities like file syncing).

When I mentioned to someone at Egnyte a while back that if they added governance to what they already had they could absolutely kill things, I wasn’t thinking about what came out in Egnyte Protect, announced earlier yesterday (June 7,2016). I was thinking more about things that the AIIM and ARMA crowds, especially ARMA, would consider governance. You know, stuff like retention management, legal holds, classification … all that records management-y goodness.

So, even though I was a little, initially, underwhelmed with what Egnyte did release, I sat back and thought that it’s not necessarily a bad thing. What was released is good and what’s coming up is good. Without getting too deep into the weeds, let me paint a little picture for you …

Let’s pretend, for the sake of discussion, that my organization just went out and procured Box as a content management platform. Let’s also pretend that I’ve got stuff stored in SharePoint and network drives, and that in addition to the standard security stuff, I also have to deal with internal policies and external regulatory requirements, a lawsuit or two, some retention requirements, …, you know, a bunch of IG stuff. Let’s also pretend that I want to monitor who’s doing what with content to determine its effectiveness. In other words, let’s say I need to manage and govern content like it’s 1999, but my content isn’t all paper or in one convenient spot that’s on my infrastructure. My point is, the what of what we need to do hasn’t really changed all that much; why, and especially how, have. Ideally, I want to, as much as possible, centralize policies and controls. Enter my IG Mirepoix (yeah, I just made that up) …

In order to meet the requirements outlined above, one could go to each of the individual repositories and do what’s necessary, hoping that things stay in sync EgnyteBoxGlassIG Logoand no one ever forgets to do anything in any of the repositories. Even if all that happened, there’s still nothing in place to handle any of the records management, legal hold, and discovery functionality needed. Note to self – go buy more software that needs to be installed, configured, and maintained. Or …

Deploy Egnyte Protect to handle my security and analytics across all the in-scope repositories; deploy GlassIG to handle the records management and related functions. The fact that two tools are needed is not an issue as the tools will be used by different roles in the organization.

I know mega-suites were all the rage for a while, but look what happened. I like the approach outlined above because it’s a best of breed approach. Each tool gets used for the stuff it’s best at. There are areas of overlap between Egnyte Protect and Box, and between GlassIG and Egnyte Protect, but it’s using the three tools as complementary technologies that, I believe, provides the greatest overall value to organizations.

5 Comments on “Three’s Company

  1. I’m a fan of this thinking, but I think something is still missing if an organization hasn’t, or doesn’t want to, consolidate all of their content to a Box repository. An enterprise content discovery, analysis and classification tool to support Box’s ability to provide access and collaboration, support Egnyte’s ability to provide trip-wire security, and support GlassIG’s ability to apply retention policy is needed. Enter Nuix … although that throws off your mirepoix analogy. My two cents.

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    • You’re right, of course. But I’m blaming the omission on Nuix marketing; remember my comments to you at AIIM15 in San Diego?

      By the way, for you I might consider changing the analogy to four-cheese pizza.

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      • Mmmm. Pizza. Yes. That’s better than carrots, celery and onions.

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  2. I am trying, and mostly failing, to map the 3 companies (GlassIG, Box,and Egnyte) to their corresponding characters on Three’s Company. That’s an exercise probably best left to the reader (or author if he’s up to it.)

    Meanwhile, I am glad for the heads-up on Egnyte. The Venn Diagrams between governance (in the AIIM / ARMA sense of the word) and privacy / data protection policy don’t overlap as neatly as customers and companies would like them to.

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    • Yeah, I was gonna try that mapping but there was no way any of you’d talk to me after.

      InfoGov is a huge, nasty beast that covers a lot of functions and technologies. We in the space have a hard time figuring out what fits where and what to call stuff; the poor customer is screwed. The Information Governance Initiative’s paint-wheel diagrams are pretty good for identifying the various disciplines and technologies, I think.

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