Case Study: Managing Information – How and Why


This is the second case study type thing I’m trying. It’ll likely be the last for a while as I have nothing left that I can publish without getting sued. Ah, the joys of being an independent consultant. Anyways …

This case study has to do with the project referenced in the two posts linked below. You may want to read them to get a better overall view of the project :

  1. Don’t Blame SharePoint;
  2. Guerrilla Tactics – IG Whether or not They Want It.

The document I’m sharing is part of a set of four docs that were delivered to the client. The purpose of each document is explained in the case study document.

The client in the case study builds electricity infrastructure; they are heavily regulated. They took the decision a while back to use SharePoint as their ECM pillar (though they don’t really know what ECM is). They also don’t have an Information Management strategy, nor any type of dedicated information governance structure. Though they rely heavily on information, and generate tons of intellectual property, they don’t do much about treating information as an asset. As far as they are concerned, information is IT’s problem and the business is just a client.

I was working as a subcontractor with ARC Business Solutions on this project. One of the key contributors to the project and the document was Chris Riley. You can follow Chris on Twitter at https://twitter.com/HoardingInfo. We knew early on in the project that the client was in ECM trouble and needed help. Though not part of the project mandate we wrote the docs up anyway (No. We didn’t bill the client extra.).

Without further ado … click the link and check it out: Managing Information at client name.

Feedback is appreciated.

The image in this post is my first attempt at visually representing the Principles of Holistic Information Governance. Click on it for the original PHIGs post and a larger version of the image.

Chris Riley, along with Shadrach White, is a co-author of Enterprise Content Management with Microsoft SharePoint.

2 Comments on “Case Study: Managing Information – How and Why

  1. I like your diagram Chris. But I question the premise of the principle called a ‘finite useful life’. As purely information, it’s limited (say to support a transaction), but isn’t info made of data? And that data is part of ‘big data’, which contributes to business intelligence over a long period of time…

    Like

    • Hi PD

      You’re correct. However, there are elements of that same transaction that are protected by law (e.g.: PII and PCI) which must be destroyed. There are also other types of information that cannot be kept forever, such as employee records.

      It’s important to do the analysis based on what type of information you’re dealing with, what it’s value is over time, what the laws are, etc. And there’s nothing to stop an organization from stripping out various elements that would provide future value and keeping them. It’s really about balance based on business environment, information / data type, risk, and so on.

      Cheers!
      Chris

      Like

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